What is Dyslexia?

According to the British Dyslexia Association, 10% of the population are dyslexic and 4% severely so. In broad terms, dyslexia is mainly a language-based learning disability.

 

Those affected have problems acquiring and retaining literacy skills such as reading, writing and spelling.

 

Those affected have problems acquiring and retaining literacy skills such as reading, writing and spelling. It is now widely accepted that dyslexia can also affect a number of other areas including memory, organisation, concentration and even balance.

 

Reading and writing are essential skills when it comes to the intellectual development of a child. But if a child has literacy problems like dyslexia, this development becomes even more challenging. The effect of this neuro-logical condition on the individual can have serious social implications too, since it can severely affect self-esteem and confidence.

 

Though dyslexia is categorised as a disability, if you see the signs and catch it early enough, using the right tools and techniques, your child should have a good chance of developing at the same pace as every other pupil.

 

Some signs to look out for are poor concentration or being easily distracted, if their performance in class is below average compared to their classmates, if they struggle with their ‘b’s and’d’s, ‘p’s and ‘q’s and use them the wrong way round, difficulty following instructions, especially written ones and missing words or adding words that are not there when reading aloud.

 

You might notice a marked inefficiency in the working or short-term memory system or difficulties ordering or sequencing; this may also show itself as clumsiness caused by the brain sending the wrong signals to parts of the body in the wrong order.

 

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